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Mother's Day is one of my favorite holidays to recognize with my Mini-Wheats. Little ones LOVE making crafts and celebrating their mommas. This is a SUPER sweet activity that is sure to be something she'll treasure. Oh, and it's easy! BONUS.

Mother's Day First Aid Kit

 One of my goals when planning a craft is to keep prep work to a minimum. This kit includes everything you need with the option of purchasing some easy store-bought items to include.

Inside the MOTHER'S DAY FIRST AID KIT you'll find an easy-cut print-and-fold box template, an easy-cut poem book (in color or B&W), and 2 styles of writing paper.
Mother's Day Project


The poet book and students written note will fit perfectly within the first aid kit box. You may wish to include some simple store bought items that go along with the poem book:
Hershey's Kisses and Hugs, bandages, buttons, erasers (I used cap eraser I already had laying around), tea bags, tissues, and a traced or stamped image of the child's hand.
Mother's Day Project
Mother's Day First Aid Kit

After students have made their box and label the students can put together their mini-poem book. While they're coloring and cutting I have students come up in small groups to fill their kits with the store-bought trinkets.

Next we discuss the note we should write to our mothers (or special ladies). Most young students struggle to write more than " I love you" or "Thank you".

I like to engage my kiddos in a conversation about all the things their special lady does for them on a daily basis. Things they may not have thought about before, like a reading a book before bed, home-cooked meals, laundry, attending school/sporting events, helping with homework, etc. We talk about how our caregivers sometimes do really special things that go unnoticed and how SPECIAL it makes someone feel when you recognize those good deeds. The notes my sweeties wrote are sure to make their recipients cry!
Mother's Day First Aid Kit

Mother's Day is such a fun holiday to celebrate but it can also be challenging depending upon the family make-up and background of your students. I've included lots of option so that any student can participate in this activity and make something special for an important lady in his/her life. I hope you and your students will enjoy it as much as mine did. My kiddos can't wait to take their kits home and MAKE THOSE MOMMAS CRY!
You can find this activity and my Mother's Day Mobile project in my TpT shop.

Mother's Day First Aid Kit

Mother's Day in the classroom

Mother's Day in the Classroom

Mother's Day in the Classroom




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One of my goals every year in my class is to inspire my students to do more than just be nice but to also dream about all the ways that they can make the world a better place. Young students are naturally conscientious, thoughtful and optimistic. Part of the joy of teaching them is learning about what things they love and care about and channeling those things into making them better learners, better people, and better citizens. That's how these units came about.
I'm a Kid President super fan. Isn't everyone? 
My very favorite Kid President video is Make the World More Awesome

After watching this video I have my students make a list of causes they care about.
After listing all of the causes near and dear to our hearts I explain to the kids about how to fight for them. There aren't a lot of resources available for little learners about activism. Many books and videos are over the kids' heads or deal with subject matter that could be confusing or upsetting. Then it dawned on me! The West brothers!
The West family is a local family that have done amazing things for our community and the world. I was lucky enough to have Jeremiah and Joshua West visit my classroom 2 years ago to read a book they wrote: Champions of Change: Live to Give
This is a story by children, for children. Joshua and Jeremiah do a wonderful job inspiring the reader with all sorts of ideas about how young people can be agents of change in their community. I love this story because my students are always so fascinated to know that it was written by kids who work so hard to fight for causes they care about.
I love to inspire my students by showing them people who have done amazing things with their lives and ideas. We talk a lot about what it means to be an activist. I designed this unit to further our discussions and introduce the idea that even kids can be activists.
You'll find a mini-book, vocabulary cards and a cut & paste worksheet to introduce activism to your little learners. The vocabulary cards can be used to make anchor charts or word sorts. The book is great for small groups or whole group instruction. I even envision after-school clubs being able to use these resources to come up with school projects and community action projects.
You will also find a writing activity and project as a culmination for this mini-unit. It is my sincere belief the the children are our future and hope for the world. As teachers I think our responsibility to help guide and inspire these young minds to do good in the world is even more urgent than ever. I hope your students learn new ways to fight for their causes and are empowered to think their voices and actions matter no matter how "big" they are. These kids will make this world AWESOME!
If you're interested in this unit you can find it here:
and the writing activity and craft for FREE here

These activities were also inspired by an even larger project #kindnessnation and #weholdthesetruths
The election season and following results have left a lot for some to desire. Life goes on, disappointment is dealt with, and change occurs. Our hope is that through this inevitable change we continue to teach and inspire our children to be kind, to be responsible, and most importantly of all, to be active participants in their communities. You will find MANY forever freebies by searching Teachers Pay Teachers using these hashtags #kindnessnation and #weholdthesetruths
Thank you, teachers. Thank you for all of your hard work making this world AWESOME!



November is my favorite time of year for so many reasons. The back-to-school hustle and bustle has settled down, I've bonded with my new group of mini-wheats and the spirit of the holidays is in the air! I've put on a classroom feast for the past 16 years. While it can seem like a lot of work, it doesn't have to be and it is so worth it!
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I love to time my classroom feast for the week of Thanksgiving but there's never a bad time to build community and break bread with your littles. It is such a valuable experience and can provide experiential learning for so many academic standards. Our feast comes at the end of a combined Social Studies and Language Arts unit on families and story elements. 
Stone Soup is a folktale that comes in many versions. These are the three that I use:

Each version is slightly different but they all end with the same lesson- all people thrive when a community shares and works together. I love to build upon this theme by tying it into our classroom community and the idea that our classroom is like a family- with rich traditions, love, acceptance, and generosity. I introduce the word gratitude and explain the magic of voicing the things you are grateful for out loud. I purchased a stone from Amazon that says gratitude on it, but any stone would do. We pass it from person to person, never letting it touch a table or the floor. Each child must say something they are grateful for before passing it along. The last child places it in our pot before we add our ingredients. (**teacher secret** I sneak the dirty, touched-by-everyone-in-the-class-stone out of the pot before we add our ingredients. But they don't need to know that.) 
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

You can find Gratitude vocabulary freebies here:
Stone soup is also ridiculously easy to make and the ingredients are common and inexpensive. I always ask parents to volunteer to bring items in. 

You can decide what works best for you but these are the items I ask for: 
diced onions (cleaned and pre-packaged, my school requires this), diced celery, 3 cartons of chicken broth, 2 cans of sliced carrots, 1 can sliced potatoes, dinner rolls, butter, sturdy paper bowls, spoons, juice and cups, fruit cups/applesauce cups, and packaged cookies for desert.  **teacher tip** I like to add a cube of bouillon for flavor.

Another friendly tip,  ask for the items to be brought in a day or two before your feast date so that you can purchase any missing items. I have put on the feast without any parent volunteers in the past and it didn't cost me much. You will also need a crock pot, ladle, paper products, and A CAN OPENER! For the love, don't forget the can opener. Not that I've ever done that or anything. While your soup simmers I love to engage my students in some Stone Soup themed activities. We list the ingredients, talk about the story elements, and compare the different versions of the story. You can find everything you need for a successful feast in my Stone Soup Printables Pack. There are handy sign-up and reminder sheets for parents and worksheets to help you plan your Stone Soup book study.
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I hope these tips have helped you plan a classroom feast. I'd love to hear your tips, experiences, or classroom traditions. Feel free to share in the comments section.  Happy Feasting!

November is my favorite time of year for so many reasons. The back-to-school hustle and bustle has settled down, I've bonded with my new group of mini-wheats and the spirit of the holidays is in the air! I've put on a classroom feast for the past 16 years. While it can seem like a lot of work, it doesn't have to be and it is so worth it!
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I love to time my classroom feast for the week of Thanksgiving but there's never a bad time to build community and break bread with your littles. It is such a valuable experience and can provide experiential learning for so many academic standards. Our feast comes at the end of a combined Social Studies and Language Arts unit on families and story elements. 
Stone Soup is a folktale that comes in many versions. These are the three that I use:

Each version is slightly different but they all end with the same lesson- all people thrive when a community shares and works together. I love to build upon this theme by tying it into our classroom community and the idea that our classroom is like a family- with rich traditions, love, acceptance, and generosity. I introduce the word gratitude and explain the magic of voicing the things you are grateful for out loud. I purchased a stone from Amazon that says gratitude on it, but any stone would do. We pass it from person to person, never letting it touch a table or the floor. Each child must say something they are grateful for before passing it along. The last child places it in our pot before we add our ingredients. (**teacher secret** I sneak the dirty, touched-by-everyone-in-the-class-stone out of the pot before we add our ingredients. But they don't need to know that.) 
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

You can find Gratitude vocabulary freebies here:
Stone soup is also ridiculously easy to make and the ingredients are common and inexpensive. I always ask parents to volunteer to bring items in. 

You can decide what works best for you but these are the items I ask for: 
diced onions (cleaned and pre-packaged, my school requires this), diced celery, 3 cartons of chicken broth, 2 cans of sliced carrots, 1 can sliced potatoes, dinner rolls, butter, sturdy paper bowls, spoons, juice and cups, fruit cups/applesauce cups, and packaged cookies for desert.  **teacher tip** I like to add a cube of bouillon for flavor.

Another friendly tip,  ask for the items to be brought in a day or two before your feast date so that you can purchase any missing items. I have put on the feast without any parent volunteers in the past and it didn't cost me much. You will also need a crock pot, ladle, paper products, and A CAN OPENER! For the love, don't forget the can opener. Not that I've ever done that or anything. While your soup simmers I love to engage my students in some Stone Soup themed activities. We list the ingredients, talk about the story elements, and compare the different versions of the story. You can find everything you need for a successful feast in my Stone Soup Printables Pack. There are handy sign-up and reminder sheets for parents and worksheets to help you plan your Stone Soup book study.
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I hope these tips have helped you plan a classroom feast. I'd love to hear your tips, experiences, or classroom traditions. Feel free to share in the comments section.  Happy Feasting!

November is my favorite time of year for so many reasons. The back-to-school hustle and bustle has settled down, I've bonded with my new group of mini-wheats and the spirit of the holidays is in the air! I've put on a classroom feast for the past 16 years. While it can seem like a lot of work, it doesn't have to be and it is so worth it!
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I love to time my classroom feast for the week of Thanksgiving but there's never a bad time to build community and break bread with your littles. It is such a valuable experience and can provide experiential learning for so many academic standards. Our feast comes at the end of a combined Social Studies and Language Arts unit on families and story elements. 
Stone Soup is a folktale that comes in many versions. These are the three that I use:

Each version is slightly different but they all end with the same lesson- all people thrive when a community shares and works together. I love to build upon this theme by tying it into our classroom community and the idea that our classroom is like a family- with rich traditions, love, acceptance, and generosity. I introduce the word gratitude and explain the magic of voicing the things you are grateful for out loud. I purchased a stone from Amazon that says gratitude on it, but any stone would do. We pass it from person to person, never letting it touch a table or the floor. Each child must say something they are grateful for before passing it along. The last child places it in our pot before we add our ingredients. (**teacher secret** I sneak the dirty, touched-by-everyone-in-the-class-stone out of the pot before we add our ingredients. But they don't need to know that.) 
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

You can find Gratitude vocabulary freebies here:
Stone soup is also ridiculously easy to make and the ingredients are common and inexpensive. I always ask parents to volunteer to bring items in. 

You can decide what works best for you but these are the items I ask for: 
diced onions (cleaned and pre-packaged, my school requires this), diced celery, 3 cartons of chicken broth, 2 cans of sliced carrots, 1 can sliced potatoes, dinner rolls, butter, sturdy paper bowls, spoons, juice and cups, fruit cups/applesauce cups, and packaged cookies for desert.  **teacher tip** I like to add a cube of bouillon for flavor.

Another friendly tip,  ask for the items to be brought in a day or two before your feast date so that you can purchase any missing items. I have put on the feast without any parent volunteers in the past and it didn't cost me much. You will also need a crock pot, ladle, paper products, and A CAN OPENER! For the love, don't forget the can opener. Not that I've ever done that or anything. While your soup simmers I love to engage my students in some Stone Soup themed activities. We list the ingredients, talk about the story elements, and compare the different versions of the story. You can find everything you need for a successful feast in my Stone Soup Printables Pack. There are handy sign-up and reminder sheets for parents and worksheets to help you plan your Stone Soup book study.
Tips and printables for putting on a classroom feast and Stone Soup book study.

I hope these tips have helped you plan a classroom feast. I'd love to hear your tips, experiences, or classroom traditions. Feel free to share in the comments section.  Happy Feasting!




The best part of being a teacher blogger is getting to connect and learn from other teachers. I am so lucky to have found a great tribe of teachers in this virtual world- dedicated, creative, HILARIOUS, and gifted teachers who I'm proud to call friends- my gals in The Primary Punchbowl! We are celebrating our official one year anniversary with this Blog Hop. 

Activities for celebrating my teacher's birthday.
In the spirit of celebration I wanted to share this FREEBIE. We all celebrate our students' birthdays but in the Elementary world our kids also love to celebrate teacher birthdays too. My kiddos love to write birthday notes to me. Using the graphic organizer helps my students to plan their writing and organize their thoughts. Its a win-win and builds community in our room. I hope your kids love it. You can download it by clicking the picture above. 

You'll find more great celebration ideas and freebies by following our 1 year anniversary blog hop and also be eligible to win a gift card to Target. Click the picture below to be linked to Wild West by Jessie and continue your hop!







The best part of being a teacher blogger is getting to connect and learn from other teachers. I am so lucky to have found a great tribe of teachers in this virtual world. Dedicated, creative, HILARIOUS, and gifted teachers who I'm proud to call friends- may gals in The Primary Punchbowl! We are celebrating our official one year anniversary with this Blog Hop. 

Activities for celebrating my teacher's birthday.
In the spirit of celebration I wanted to share this FREEBIE. We all celebrate our students' birthdays but in the Elementary world our kids love to celebrate our birthdays too. My kiddos love to write birthday notes to me. Using the graphic organizer helps my students to plan their writing and organize their thoughts. Its a win-win and builds community in our room. I hope your kids love it. You can download it by clicking the picture above. 

You'll find more great celebration ideas and freebies by following our 1 year anniversary blog hop and also be eligible to win a gift card to Target. Click the picture below to be linked to Wild West by Jessie and continue your hop!




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